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CELSIR Launches first-of-its-kind 'Safe House' for Formerly Incarcerated Women - Nigeria


The ruby house stands as a shelter for formerly incarcerated women, offering them a haven to embark on the journey of reintegrating into society. (Photo: The Conversation)

The Centre for Legal Support and Inmate Rehabilitation (CELSIR) has announced its partnership with “a new way of life” in the launch of the first of its kind safe house (half way home), for formerly incarcerated women in Nigeria.


Speaking during the launch in Lagos recently, Executive Director, CELSIR Joke Aladesanmi, noted that over the last three years, the centre has emerged as a prominent force dedicated to the rehabilitation of incarcerated individuals, offering programmes aimed at facilitating their successful reintegration into society, enabling them to become self-reliant and valuable members of the community.


Saying the unveiling of the safe house marks a pivotal moment in the journey of reformation and reintegration for formerly incarcerated women in the country, she disclosed that 95 per cent of the incarcerated individuals will eventually re-enter society, whether they have served their sentences or been discharged and acquitted.


However, she observed that the post-incarceration path is filled with challenges, including the enduring burden of stigmatisation and a lack of employment opportunities as well as the risk of re-incarceration.


Named “the ruby house,” she said the safe house draws inspiration from the rich symbolism of the ruby color, signifying qualities of compassion, strength, and courage.


“The ruby house stands as a shelter for formerly incarcerated women, offering them a haven to embark on the journey of reintegrating into society.


“Here, they are equipped with the essential skills and support needed to foster independence and pave the way for a brighter and empowered future as they navigate their path to societal reintegration,” she stated.


Disclosing that the ruby safe house is designed to accommodate 15 residents with comfort, she said a holistic approach was adopted to the rehabilitation of formerly incarcerated women.


Specifically, she said the facility includes specialised areas such as a skills room, a library, and an individual counseling space, fostering an environment conducive to comprehensive recovery.


Moreover, she revealed that a designated room was allocated to provide privacy for nursing mothers and pregnant women, recognising and catering to their specific needs.


This thoughtful design, she further explained, ensures that the safe house is not just a residence but a supportive and tailored environment for the diverse needs of its residents.


Source: Guardian

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